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Deep Breathing Exercises 101

 
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palla Reply with quote
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Joined: 14 Jan 2010
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Location: Milton, FL

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 1:46 pm    Post subject: Deep Breathing Exercises 101
 
This piece is stated at the end of this document, but i felt it to be so important that I wanted to post it first, encase your attention span is like mine:)

[SP's are a very life-altering experience. It's important that you stay strong, or if your a loved one reading this for more info, stay strong for them. It took me a long time to go outside and pick up my phone again. It can be difficult explaining the same story to everyone over and over. People who havent had your experience or similar situations often have difficulty understanding what you are going through. Do not be afraid to notate your limitations and resrictions. If you are trying to learn more about someone you know who has been a victim to an SP, be patient. recovery can take years sometimes. And most often, people live with certain symptoms their entire lifetime. We are all learning about this horrible malfunction, and its unnatural characteristics. Keep faith in your yourself and your religion, and together we will all one day crack this mysterious code that is Spontaneous Pneumothorax.]


NOTE!!! ***I AM NOT A DOCTOR, JUST A VICTIM LIKE EACH OF YOU***

After having 4 Sp's, VATS, Pleurodesis and a bullectomy i have delt with the many discomforts following an SP. Like many of you, it can be troubling finding ways to cope with the pains and sometimes unusual sensations that occur in the body and chest area. This particular post will focus on Deep breathing methods that i have discovered, and in theory invented, to help alleviate the pains and shortness of breath. I hope these help.

1) It wouldnt be a fruitful discussion without the mentioning of pain medication. I have personally had to administor several medications for moderate to severe pain associated with SP's: Loratab, Loracet, Percacet, Roxy-Contin, Oxy-Contin, Codones, OTC's, 800mg families, ect..
Some people would rather avoid these types of medications and often you may find yourself without them to turn to. They often help more than they fail(Be sure to monitor your dosage of daily acetaminophen levels, do not exceed 4000mg daily)

2) Spirometer- Sometimes this trusted little gadget can do more than help you maintain a solid intake of air, it offers reassurance to the approx. amount of lung capacity, and can often help those recently following post-op SP to help restrengthen the lungs and progress the re-expansion process.

3)Find your angle- Everybody has an appropraite angle in which the chest pains seem to subside a bit. The usual 45 degree is suitable(I find mine to be slightly more elevated than that. This can be the difference between falling asleep and staring at the ceiling some nights for me).

4)Heating Pad- Welcome this little friend into your home and never let him leave your side, ...cough, no pun intended... I use my heating pad so much that i think they should be standard issue upon your discharge. I find that wrapping it around the affected side, or simply laying on it really helps me out ALOT!

5)Cupping the armpit- Im not sure why this seems to be a biological impulse, but im sure many of you would agree, this helps, even if its mental. I almost always grab my affected side and kinda flex a bit, sometimes fighting pressure with pressure seems to help. DO NOT BE EXCESSIVE THOUGH, you wouldnt want to end up in the same position and have a real reason to grip your sides again.

These next precedures all incorperate the same type of breathing methods. These are of course custom-fitted, due to size, weight, capicity, ect, and cant be absolute, just find what works for you.
I will break this into two sections.(1) The three types of deep breathing to use, and (2) The position of the body during these breathing exercises.

DBE= Deep Breathing Exercise

DEEP BREATHING:
1) 10 seconds, release- Of course, the duration in which one can hold their breathe and the amount one can aquire is entirely subjective and depends on the person. Use your spirometer to monitor the intake speed and the amount until your comfortable without it, if needed! Take a natural deep breath of air, using your diaphram and relaxing your shoulders until you feel the tension begin in your lungs. Hold this breathe in for several seconds 5-15 is suitable. Slowly release the air out, rinse and repeat. I can usually feel the capacity begin to exceed over a few of the reputitions and that there is a sensation of released tension in my chest when done correctly.

2) In-and-Out- This is basically just taking in a deep breathe and releasing. Try to get the reciprication equal and avoid becoming light headed. This may be natural to you already, and if so great:)

3) Substained-I should note: THIS SHOULD NOT BE DONE DIRECTLY FOLLOWING YOUR RELEASE! This is a method that should be attempted later in the recovery process. Over extending the lungs could lead to another collapse, so use with caution. Very simple. Take a natural deep breath, as mentioned before, hold it as long as you feel safe doing, and slowly release. Overexposure to this method could lead to pour aspiration, so this should be done if your feel a sudden deminishing in breath, or to help with pains around the chest wall

This next section is for the types of body positions that i have personally found to be effective when dealing with this experience. Like i have stated, I AM NOT A DOCTOR, Just a victim to the relentless and puzzling disease, like each of you!

(1) Hug It Out- Many people agree that hugging a pillow while doing a DBE can be quite effective. I resort to this commonly and it really helps. Also, dont be afraid to resort to hugging your knees to your chest(if its a comfortable position) or a loved one, they probally want and/or need it after watching empathetically from the sideline and wishing they could help so give them some incentive and the affection doesnt hurt either:)

(2) Arms Above The Head- How you do this and in which ways this seems comfortable is entirely up to you. Im certain there is some logical, medical explaination on why the relieves tension from the chest sometimes. I hold my hands above my head, or on them and use DBE's, particularly when i get pains in my shoulders. Sometimes, this is not very comfortable and if thats the case resort to a more conventional method.

(3) Lumbar- Ugh, those nasty back pains. If your like me you had them well before your first collapse, and will probally have them at your final moments so get used to them. And while your at it, find a way to relieve them. Oh wait, the ol' heating pad may come in handy, and possibly a pillow. A wise man on a mountain once said;"Heat and Pillow make back feel nice". Ok, i said that but its true, sometimes a little lower-back support coupled with some heat can go a long ways.

(4)Laying On Chest- I know some of you are reading this and saying "He did not just say that!?" Yeppers, on rare occasions the only way to put the right pressure that sooths the chest or back and shoulder is to use gravity. I find this to be a temporary fix and only helps when my back or shoulders are burning with pain. Also, when i need pressure on my whole front chest and im laying down already

(5)Massaging and Poking- This may seem radical to some, but if you have dealt with these for years and know how your body reacts, then you probally already do this subconscio...umm, that word. Sometimes, if i press my finger between the ribs where i hurt, or around my scar tissue and message or kinda poke lightly, it can help release tension in those areas. Put that knife down, only fingers here silly. Use with care, and know your limits. Come to understand your body, each of us are different and we each have our own methods that work best.

(5) Stay Strong- SP's are a very life-altering experience. Its important that you stay strong, or if your a loved one reading this for more info, stay strong for them. It took me a long time to go outside and pick up my phone again. It can be difficult explaining the same story to everyone over and over. People who havent had your experience or similar situations often have difficulty understanding what you are going through. Do not be afraid to notate your limitations and resrictions. If you are trying to learn more about someone you know who has been a victim to an SP, be patient. recovery can take years sometimes. And most often, people live with certain symptoms their entire lifetime. We are all learning about this horrible malfunction, and its unnatural characteristics. Keep faith in your yourself and your religion, and together we will all one day crack this mysterious code that is Spontaneous Pneumothorax.
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NPSchmitt Reply with quote
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Location: Portland, OR. USA

PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 1:28 am    Post subject:
 
Ahh found it. Cool, thanks. The heating pad is one I'll definitely have to try out after my upcoming surgery.
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